Tags: stgm

Beverly Cleary, 1916 - 2021.

Beverly Cleary - born in McMinville in 1916 - has left us.
(HT: ONTD https://ohnotheydidnt.livejournal.com/120392439.html)

https://www.opb.org/article/2021/03/26/beverly-cleary-has-died-oregon-author/
OPB: 'Beloved author and Oregon native Beverly Cleary has died. She was 104.

Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph the Mouse are among some of her best-known characters. More than half a century after her first book was published, sales are still strong, with more than 91 million books sold and counting. ...'

2021-02-17 Wednesday night

It was only this afternoon that I learned, via Instapundit, that large parts of the Portland area have been experiencing a prolonged power outage.

https://www.kgw.com/article/weather/severe-weather/portland-oregon-power-outage-winter-snow-ice-storm/283-fd3a5a75-2b21-4b0e-a288-e41b16acb425

https://www.kgw.com/article/weather/severe-weather/pge-worst-case-scenario-some-could-be-without-power-for-10-days/283-bf53d3f5-0e4c-40c2-861b-196fe27026dd

I'm fortunate that my area in Hillsboro seems to have been entirely spared.

The new job is going well, one month on. More money and less stress than my last gig, I could get used to this.

I've been carless for the last two years or so now, but that might change in the near future. I'm filling out financing applications and making appointments for test drives.

In the news, Rush Limbaugh has left us. Tammy Bruce's tribute is here:

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1362128126273347586.html

Only yesterday.

I had the pleasure of meeting David Ehrlich once in his Jerusalem cafe/bookstore. He was a close friend of my longtime friend Professor Michael Weingrad.

He is remembered by Michael here:
https://www.pdx.edu/judaic/news/david-ehrlich-memoriam

'David Ehrlich - In Memoriam
Author: Michael Weingrad
Posted: March 24, 2020

It is with great sorrow that we announce the passing of David Ehrlich (1959-2020), father, writer, founder of Jerusalem's legendary literary cafe Tmol Shilshom, and the 2009 Schusterman Israeli Artist-in-Residence at Portland State University's Judaic Studies department.

David was the author of three collections of short stories in Hebrew, as well as the collection in English translation Who Will Die Last: Stories of Life in Israel (Syracuse University Press, 2013).

David's residency at PSU was widely appreciated by students and community members. A number of PSU students decided to visit Israel for the first time after taking a course on Israeli literature with David. Portland's Jewish Theatre Collaborative created and performed a dramatic reading of his stories, and David spoke to audiences in Portland, Seattle, and Eugene about literature, gay identity in Israel, and the challenges of keeping a cafe open during the Intifada. He valued spending time in Oregon with the late Alter Wiener, a Holocaust survivor who was a childhood friend of David's father, also a Holocaust survivor from Poland. David spoke frequently of how much he loved his time in Portland, and frequently sported his PSU baseball cap on the streets of Jerusalem.

Tmol Shilshom, a Jerusalem cultural institution, first opened in 1994 and is a favorite destination for its countless visitors over the years, a warm and welcoming haven for a diverse cross-section of Jerusalem's population. Tmol has long been known as an LGBTQ-friendly place (David served on the board of Jerusalem's LGBTQ community center) as well as a popular choice for young religious Jews on a first date. The cafe's rich schedule of readings by Israel's foremost writers was launched with a poetry reading by David's friend Yehuda Amichai, and continues today with poetry slams, book launches, and musical performances. All this reflected David's warmth of personality, love of books, and openness to people.

David was a beloved friend to many in Israel, the United States, and throughout the world, a true portion of the beauty Jerusalem is said to have been granted from on high. He is survived by his parents, his sister, his two 12 year old children, and his friend Tamar Baum with whom he co-parented their twins. May his memory be a blessing...'

Follow the link for a picture, and links in the original.

At the Forward, David is remembered by writers and others who knew him:
https://forward.com/news/israel/442313/longing-for-yesterday-a-tribute-to-the-late-david-ehrlich-of-tmol-shilshom/

May his memory be for a blessing. Blessed is the Righteous Judge.

San Diego synagogue shooting.

An armed attacker entered a Chabad synagogue in Poway, near San Diego, California, on the Sabbath and last day of Passover, and killed 60-year-old Lori Gilbert-Kaye while injuring 3 more. The suspect is identified as 19-year-old John T. Earnest. Even after being shot and wounded, Rabbi Goldstein stood before his congregation and said “We are strong. We are united. They can’t break us.”
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Return to the Undisclosed Location.

If you take Highway 30 out of Portland, you'll head to the north-west along the Columbia river. You'll pass Linnton, with its fish sign and electronic speed signs flashing accusatory amber numerals, and the beautiful St. Johns Bridge. Keep going, and eventually you'll get to Scappoose, and then Saint Helens. Somewhere between Linnton and Scappoose, if you turn off to the left on one of the roads that lead up into the hills and then drive for 10 or 15 minutes, you'll get to where I used to work and live.

But if you're driving from Hillsboro, you don't take Highway 30 at all; instead, you head stright north, through the farm country of Helvetia. You go from silicon chips to cow chips in the blink of an eye. Even for someone who's not generally keen on driving, it's a beautiful trip.

I took off work a little early and got there at 4:30 sharp. Joseph, visiting from Israel, greeted me at the door and invited me in. Rodney came out a few minutes later. It's customary to hold a prayer service at the house of the mourner, but we didn't have the 10 men needed, so we headed out to the synagogue in Portland.

Rodney was doing as well as could be expected. He'd recently had a close-cropped haircut and a shave - probably last week he foresaw Chana's time coming, and took care of his grooming in advance of the mourning period, when one doesn't cut one's hair for 30 days. He managed the occasional smile, and alternated between muffled sobs and his trademark cackle. He told the same stories about himself and Chana that we'd all heard 1000 times - but, well, this was the time to tell them.

I am roughly intermediate in age between Rodney and Chana, and their grown children (who are in their 40s). I don't think I was ever really close with the old couple - they kept everyone at a distance. They were content to live on their hilltop and mingle as little as possible with the mere mortals below.

So it would not be true to say that I looked at them as parent figures. But I think you could say that my relationship with them was comparable to the relationship you might have with your parents, as you grow older and you reflect on both the good and the bad things you took away from your parents growing up.

I will not remember Chana and Rodney entirely with fondness. I'll say this about them, though - the paycheck might not have been so steady, but I am the richer for having known them.

At any rate, my business with them is done, and I've got my own life to get back to.

Boss Lady remembered.

The YouTube video is not embeddable, but it is publicly viewable. This is from Chana's funeral yesterday. Rodney, aka Boss Man, talks for a few minutes starting at about 8:45.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yok72rsajhA&feature=player_embedded

Via Joseph's website.


As LJ friends who were following me last year may remember, my relationship with Rodney and Chana was complicated and we did not end on entirely good terms. I did not attend the funeral yesterday; I'd have felt awkward. But I do plan to try to make it the evening memorial prayer service (shiva minyan) today if I can.

Chana and Rodney were an extraordinary couple and Chana lived a remarkable life.